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Wednesday, August 12, 2009

How Can One Benefit From A Large Twitter Following?

Some of Twitter's 12.8 million active users will benefit handsomely for building a larger Follower's list, while other people will not.

It is pointed out by
@web2marketer, "It's not about how many Twitter followers you have...the only thing that matters is - are they listening?"

This is the key, of course.

Some people build huge lists of Followers, but don't say anything worthwhile or interesting. Some are only interested in building their Followers list for the sake of building Followers.

If no one wants to listen to what you have to say, it does not matter whether you have 1 Follower or 2.9 million Followers. If no one is "listening" to what you have to say, you will not make any money from your participation in Twitter.

On the other hand, if people are "listening" to what you have to say and "clicking" the links you tell them to click, then you have a good chance of earning real money as a result of your Twitter activities.

It has been said that the consumer needs to see or hear your name or your marketing message 7 times, before they will trust you enough to buy from you. Professionals in the direct marketĂ­ng industry suggest that 82% of all consumers (business people or otherwise) will buy your products or services on the second to the ninth exposure to your marketing message.

Twitter allows you to carry a continuous dialog with those most likely to buy what you are selling - through the Public Timeline of the people following you in Twitter. Once people have started to pay attention to what you tell them, and once they start absorbing your marketing message, then gaining your Followers trust is made easier. Once people are listening to you, you can earn their trust fairly quickly.

An idea presented by @contentmanager is that television has had 80+ years to perfect its advertising model. Television seems committed to the concept of 42 minutes of content to anchor 18 minutes of advertising. These numbers translate into
70% content to provide an anchor for its 30% advertising. In context, he says that the 70% content is designed to attract attention and win trust, and then the 30% advertising is designed to earn profĂ­ts and cover the costs of building content.

Understand That It Is A Numbers Game

As a successful Twitter marketer, your first goal is always to attract Followers (an audience). Your second goal is to win the trust of your Followers (your viewing audience). Only after you have earned the trust of your Followers should you endeavor to advertise to your Twitter Followers list (to earn revenue). If you have earned the trust of your Twitter Followers, revenue is certain to follow.

But, as with anything in business, it is a numbers game. A certain percentage of the number of people exposed to your Twitter profile will become Followers. A certain percentage of those people following you, will actually read what you have to say. A certain percentage of those people will click your links. And if that link leads to a page where you can earn revenue, only a certain percentage of people will buy your pitch.

For most people, the only certainty is that they need to grow their audience, and in the case of the Twitter community, they need to grow their list of Twitter Followers. In the numbers game, if you can build up your audience, you can boost your revenue. It is as simple as that.

Understanding The Value Of The Twitter Community

In March of 2008, Twitter was estimated to have one million active users, according to Michael Arrington of TechCrunch. But amazingly, over the course of the following year, Twitter was able to expand its user base by 32-37 times, according to which news source you trust for your data.

On July 30th 2009, the
Philadelphia Enquirer reported that Twitter had "increased its user base by 37-fold to more than 32 million users worldwide, 18-20 million of whom reside in the United States".

Now, the naysayers are fond of pointing out that Twitter's attrition rate is quite large, with 60% of new users disappearing after signing up for the service. But if the Philadelphia Enquirer's estimation is correct that "only 40 percent of first-timers become habitual visitors", then the remaining 12.8 million users still make a viable and vibrant Twitter community.

Each individual user inside the Twitter community is capable of building his or her own community of Followers.

As Ashton Kutcher has taught us, building a Follower list is fairly straight forward - when people are interested in you and what you have to say, they will follow you on Twitter to see what you have to say.

To date, nearly 3 million Twitter users have decided that they care enough about Kutcher's life to follow his personal tweets. Of course, I am sure it helps that he occasionally
posts pictures of his wife, Demi Moore, in his tweets. Not only did Kutcher share a shot of his Demi's derriere, he also proved that rich people have ugly furniture too.

How to Build a Profitable Twitter Profile

Twitter is one of the fastest growing marketplaces on the Internet. The reason why so many people like Twitter is because it is actually the perfect communication tool for people who don't understand and don't want to learn about Internet technology and the technological geek-speak that goes along with it.

A few years back, I asked someone for his dad's email address. The son replied telling me that you just email his name. The son was clueless that there was an actual email address behind the shortcut for his dad's name. He did not understand email, and he did not care that he did not understand it. He was able to use it in a manner that was easy for him, and that is all that really mattered.

What makes Twitter so popular to the masses is that one does not have to be tech-savvy to use the service. The new user simply needs to locate the profile of the person he or she wants to follow, and then the user simply clicks "Follow". From that day forward, anytime the person "Followed" posts (tweets) new information to his or her micro-blog, Followers will be notified about the message in the Twitter Timeline.

 

The only thing that is really difficult about Twitter is that new people seldom understand that they must "Follow" someone, before they start to receive messages from others. But once someone has chosen to follow a few people, they get the idea behind Twitter very quickly.

With its' system of 140 character micro-posts (referred to as "tweets"), users are able to communicate information to other users. Sometimes the tweeted info is a random comment, but often the tweets mean something to somebody.

For the average consumer, they can log into Twitter to update grandma about the lives of the grandchildren and to provide links to family pictures.

Although the service has been available since 2006, the Internet marketing community was really slow to catch on to the value of the Twitter community. Most Internet marketers hadn't heard of Twitter until 2008. Even then, online marketers were slow to see any real value in the platform. But in 2009, Twitter finally hit its stride in getting the word out about its service, in large part due to the Ashton Kutcher vs. CNN Twitter Follower Challenge.

Ashton Kutcher (@aplusk) challenged CNN (@cnnbrk) to a race to one million Twitter Followers. On April 17th, 2009, Ashton became the first Twitter user to reach one million followers. CNN passed the mark a few hours later, but Ashton won the race fair and square.

Uploading Files with a Multipart POST

Uploading Files with a Multipart POST

11.9.1. Problem

You need to upload a file or a set of files with an HTTP multipart POST.

11.9.2. Solution

Create a MultipartPostMethod and add File objects as parameters using addParameter( ) and addPart( ). The MultipartPostMethod creates a request with a Content-Type header of multipart/form-data, and each part is separated by a boundary. The following example sends two files in an HTTP multipart POST:

               import org.apache.commons.httpclient.HttpClient;

import org.apache.commons.httpclient.HttpException;

import org.apache.commons.httpclient.methods.MultipartPostMethod;

import org.apache.commons.httpclient.methods.multipart.FilePart;

HttpClient client = new HttpClient( );

       

// Create POST method

String weblintURL = "http://ats.nist.gov/cgi-bin/cgi.tcl/echo.cgi";

MultipartPostMethod method =

    new MultipartPostMethod( weblintURL );

File file = new File( "data", "test.txt" );

               File file2 = new File( "data", "sample.txt" );

               method.addParameter("test.txt", file );

               method.addPart( new FilePart( "sample.txt", file2, "text/plain",

"ISO-8859-1" ) );

// Execute and print response

client.executeMethod( method );

String response = method.getResponseBodyAsString( );

System.out.println( response );

method.releaseConnection( );

Two File objects are added to the MultipartPostMethod using two different methods. The first method, addParameter( ), adds a File object and sets the file name to test.txt. The second method, addPart(), adds a FilePart object to the MultipartPostMethod. Both files are sent in the request separated by a part boundary, and the script echoes the location and type of both files on the server:

<h3>Form input</h3>

<pre>

sample.txt = /tmp/CGI14480.4 sample.txt {text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1}

test.txt = /tmp/CGI14480.2 test.txt {application/octet-stream;

charset=ISO-8859-1}

</pre>

11.9.3. Discussion

Adding a part as a FilePart object allows you to specify the Multipurpose Internet Main Extensions (MIME) type and the character set of the part. In this example, the sample.txt file is added with a text/plain MIME type and an ISO-8859-1 character set. If a File is added to the method using addParameter( ) or setParameter( ), it is sent with the default application/octet-stream type and the default ISO-8859-1 character set.

When HttpClient executes the MultipartPostMethod created in the previous example, the following request is sent to the server. The Content-Type header is multipart/form-data, and an arbitrary boundary is created to delineate multiple parts being sent in the request:

POST /cgi-bin/cgi.tcl/echo.cgi HTTP/1.1

User-Agent: Jakarta Commons-HttpClient/3.0final

Host: ats.nist.gov

Content-Length: 498

Content-Type: multipart/form-data; boundary=----------------31415926535

8979323846

------------------314159265358979323846

Content-Disposition: form-data; name=test.txt; filename=test.txt

Content-Type: application/octet-stream; charset=ISO-8859-1

Content-Transfer-Encoding: binary

This is a test.

------------------314159265358979323846

Content-Disposition: form-data; name=sample.txt; filename=sample.txt

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Content-Transfer-Encoding: binary

This is a sample

------------------314159265358979323846--

Each part contains a Content-Disposition header to name the part and a Content-Type header to classify the part with a MIME type and character set.

 

Monday, August 3, 2009

Online subscription to RSS feeds using Google Reader.

we can subscribe and manage to RSS feeds using Google feature Google Reader.
In this the trends is very useful feature.
and we can categorise and share with other friends.
http://www.google.com/reader
Post images in Tweeter

How do I create a Twitpic account?
If you have a Twitter account then you already have a Twitpic account, just login to Twitpic with your Twitter username and password and you are all set.

If you don't have a Twitter account you can sign up for one for free at Twitter.com
How do I delete a photo?
1. Login to Twitpic
2. Click the "Home" link at the top of the page, this will take you to your photo stream
3. Click the trash can icon () next to the photo you wish to delete
How do I delete a comment on my photo?
1. Login to Twitpic
2. Navigate to the photo with the comment you wish to delete
3. Click the trash can icon () next to the comment you wish to delete
How do I delete a tag on my photo?
1. Login to Twitpic
2. Navigate to the photo with the tag you wish to delete
3. Click the trash can icon () next to the tag you wish to delete

http://www.twitpic.com/faq.do

Sunday, August 2, 2009

Flock social webbrowser

What is Flock?
Flock is a browser. The people here at Flock are committed to building a browser unlike anything you’ve ever experienced before - because we start by focusing on user needs. We take pride in solving for common behaviors on the Web that seem clunky today, and will seem ridiculous tomorrow. We’re taking you there.

We’re focused on keeping you close and better connected to the people, places and things you love, more informed about the topics that turn you on, and smiling about the way it all comes together. We love nothing more than hearing from users who didn’t know they were experiencing ‘conventional browser fatigue’ until they’ve downloaded Flock..and voila. Their lives get that much better.

We're big fans of the many interesting and innovative sites and services that continue to emerge to keep our online lives interesting. We also share a common vision that your browser should do much more than just get you to where you want to go. It should make sure you don’t miss out on things that are important to you and help you break down any barrier to easily share, publish, discover and communicate, so that you can enjoy the web to the fullest extent possible.

If you’re not sold yet, download Flock and get ready to meet your new favorite browser.
http://flock.com

w.bloggar post to other blogs remote

What is w.bloggar?
The w.bloggar is an application that acts as an interface between the user and one or more blog(s); in other words, it is a Post and Template editor, with several features and resources that the browser based blog editors do not offer.

Because w.bloggar runs over the Windows GUI, it allows the user to edit posts without being connected to the Internet. Posts can be saved locally; and anytime the user wants to publish a new text, one click on the w.bloggar icon in the system tray brings up the editor, and one more click will post it to the weblog.

Another great advantage of w.bloggar is that it is compatible with most of the weblog systems available, allowing an advanced user to have only one interface to several accounts hosted on several different sites, using different publishing systems.

To communicate with the weblog, w.bloggar requires that the blog system have implemented an API (Application Programming Interface.) Currently, w.bloggar is compatible with all tools that implements Blogger API, metaWeblog API, MovableType API and b2 API; all based on the XML-RPC definition.
http://www.wbloggar.com
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